Do you know ?

Do you know ?

Do you know that Obama retired at 55, Trump started at 70. Sydney is 3 hours ahead of Perth, but that doesn’t make Perth slow.

Someone graduated at the age of 22, but waited 5 years

before securing a good job. Someone became a CEO at 25 and died at 50. While another became a CEO at 50 and lived to 90 years. Someone is still single, while someone else got married.

Everyone in this world works based on their time zone.

People around you might seem ahead of you and some might

seem to be behind you. But everyone is running their own race, in their own time. Do not envy them and do not mock them. They are in their time zone, and you are in yours.

Life is about waiting for the right moment to act.

So relax.

You are not early.

You are not late. You are very much on time!

~ Iamdarshan

#quote

Quote of the day

Knowing that you’re becoming the person You always wanted
to be is the greatest source of inspiration and No-one is destined to live a life of poverty, because each of us has the ability to change everything in this life. The law of attraction is the law of creation, and it allows each person to create the life they want.

~ Iamdarshan


DOUBLE TAP IF YOU AGREE 💪

#Motivationviral #bike #gift #funny #Future ®Iamdarshan. #Repost @darshan_h_sheth
#entrepreneur #business #success #australia #friday #quote #dubai #london #newyork #sydney #la #tflers #italy #grind #tbt #picoftheday #weekend #fashion #motivation #germany #paris #india #tbt #picoftheday

“There are no such things as limits to growth, because there are no limits to the human capacity for intelligence, imagination, and wonder.”~Ronald Reagan

“There are no such things as limits to growth, because there are no limits to the human capacity for intelligence, imagination, and wonder.”
Ronald Reagan
~ Iamdarshan
DOUBLE TAP IF YOU AGREE 
#Motivationviral #bike #gift #funny #Future ®Iamdarshan. #Repost @darshan_h_sheth
#entrepreneur #business #success #australia #friday #quote #dubai #london #newyork #sydney #la #tflers #italy #grind #tbt #picoftheday #weekend #fashion #motivation #germany #paris #india #tbt #picoftheday

Are AI Machines to Trust more than People? #ArtificialIntelligence

Are AI Machines to Trust more than People?

Artificial intelligence is the sub-domain of computing. The goal of research for AI is to develop programs (software), which will enable computers to behave in a way that is characterized as intelligent. The first researches relate to the very roots of computing. The idea of creating machines that will be able to perform various tasks intelligently was the central preoccupation of computer science researchers who ventured to research artificial intelligence throughout the second half of the 20th century. Today, research in artificial intelligence is focused on expert systems, translation systems in limited domains, the recognition of human speech and written text, automatic proofers of the theorem, as well as the constant interest in creating generally intelligent, autonomous agents.

Artificial intelligence as a term in a wider sense means the capacity of an artificial creation to realize functions that are a characteristic of human thinking. The possibility of developing a similar creation has awakened people’s interest since ancient times. However, only in the second half of the 20th century, such a possibility was given to the first tool (computers), which opened the way for this venture.

With the advent of modern science, Artificial Intelligence research is developing over two basic directions: psychological and physiological research of the nature of the human mind, and the technological development of increasingly complex information systems.

In this sense, the term AI is initially attributed to systems and computer programs with the capacity to realize complex tasks, simulating the functioning of human thinking, although even today, is quite far from the goal. In this sphere, the most important areas of research are the processing of information, the recognition of models from different areas of knowledge, games and applied areas, such as medicine, for example.

Disclaimer the content is a copyright content of https://www.7wdata.be

Boycott effect? Chinese smartphone brands’ market share in India slips to 72%

Oppo store

The Covid-19 pandemic and the lockdown, followed by anti-China sentiments in India on account of the border dispute seems to have severely dented the dominance of Chinese brands in the domestic market with their total market share falling sharply form an all-time high of 81% to 72% during the recently concluded April-June quarter of current calendar year.

According to Counterpoint Research, Chinese brands including Xiaomi, Oppo, Vivo and Realme controlled 81% of India’s smartphone market, which is their all-time high share.

The pandemic coupled with anti-China sentiment severely impacted their market share, which declined for the first time in almost two years.

Counterpoint’s research analyst Shilpi Jain said, ‘This was mainly due to the mixture of stuttering supply for some major Chinese brands such as Oppo, Vivo and Realme, and growing anti-China sentiment that was compounded by stringent actions taken by the government to ban more than 50 apps of Chinese origin and delay the import of goods from China amid extra scrutiny. This all resulted from India-China border dispute during June’. However, local manufacturing, R&D operations, attractive value-for-money offerings and strong channel entrenchment by Chinese brands leaves very few options for consumers to choose from, she added.

‘Additionally, in the era of globalisation, it is difficult to label a product based on country of origin as components are being sourced from many different countries. This development has given a window of opportunity for brands like Samsung and local Indian brands, like Micromax and Lava, to recapture market share. Further, Jio-Google’s partnership to bring a highly affordable 4G Android smartphones could also gain ground, banking on the growing vocal for local sentiment,’ Jain added.

India smartphone shipments

A top industry executive, who did not wish to be identified, said ‘Share of Indian brands shrunk from 16-18% in early 2015 to around 1% or even under as on date. Indians couldn’t capitalise on the change from 3G to 4G. Chinese grew on that base and then ate into Korean and US firms’ share. They haven’t looked back, till corona happened’.

The pandemic and lockdown also impacted domestic smartphone market with shipments during April-June 2020 declining 51% y-o-y to a little over 18 million units. The disruption in supply chain during lockdown was so pronounced that April was a complete washout in terms of shipments.

‘Covid-19 pandemic wiped-out almost 40 days of production as well as sales of smartphones due to the nationwide lockdown. During May, the government allowed shops to open and online channel deliveries for non-essential items. As a result, the market witnessed a surge in sales as lockdown restrictions were slowly lifted,’ said Prachir Singh, senior research analyst at Counterpoint.

On supply side, the factories were shut down in April and started operating in May, which resulted in supply shortages for some manufacturers. Some brands maintained the supply of their products by importing fully assembled handsets. Additionally, last week of the quarter saw components being held up at customs, which also impacted the supply chain, he added.

However, the market is returning to normal with June shipments registering only a small decline of 0.3% Y-o-Y, helped by pent-up demand as well as a push from brands. Due to concerns over potential Covid infection, consumers prefer contactless purchasing and online channels. Smartphone brands are also recognising this trend by pushing more inventory to online channels, the agency pointed out.

Disclaimer: This story is auto-aggregated by a computer program and has not been created or edited by Me . Publisher: The Financial Express

Boycott effect? Chinese smartphone brands’ market share in India slips to 72%

Oppo store

The Covid-19 pandemic and the lockdown, followed by anti-China sentiments in India on account of the border dispute seems to have severely dented the dominance of Chinese brands in the domestic market with their total market share falling sharply form an all-time high of 81% to 72% during the recently concluded April-June quarter of current calendar year.

According to Counterpoint Research, Chinese brands including Xiaomi, Oppo, Vivo and Realme controlled 81% of India’s smartphone market, which is their all-time high share.

The pandemic coupled with anti-China sentiment severely impacted their market share, which declined for the first time in almost two years.

Counterpoint’s research analyst Shilpi Jain said, ‘This was mainly due to the mixture of stuttering supply for some major Chinese brands such as Oppo, Vivo and Realme, and growing anti-China sentiment that was compounded by stringent actions taken by the government to ban more than 50 apps of Chinese origin and delay the import of goods from China amid extra scrutiny. This all resulted from India-China border dispute during June’. However, local manufacturing, R&D operations, attractive value-for-money offerings and strong channel entrenchment by Chinese brands leaves very few options for consumers to choose from, she added.

‘Additionally, in the era of globalisation, it is difficult to label a product based on country of origin as components are being sourced from many different countries. This development has given a window of opportunity for brands like Samsung and local Indian brands, like Micromax and Lava, to recapture market share. Further, Jio-Google’s partnership to bring a highly affordable 4G Android smartphones could also gain ground, banking on the growing vocal for local sentiment,’ Jain added.

India smartphone shipments

A top industry executive, who did not wish to be identified, said ‘Share of Indian brands shrunk from 16-18% in early 2015 to around 1% or even under as on date. Indians couldn’t capitalise on the change from 3G to 4G. Chinese grew on that base and then ate into Korean and US firms’ share. They haven’t looked back, till corona happened’.

The pandemic and lockdown also impacted domestic smartphone market with shipments during April-June 2020 declining 51% y-o-y to a little over 18 million units. The disruption in supply chain during lockdown was so pronounced that April was a complete washout in terms of shipments.

‘Covid-19 pandemic wiped-out almost 40 days of production as well as sales of smartphones due to the nationwide lockdown. During May, the government allowed shops to open and online channel deliveries for non-essential items. As a result, the market witnessed a surge in sales as lockdown restrictions were slowly lifted,’ said Prachir Singh, senior research analyst at Counterpoint.

On supply side, the factories were shut down in April and started operating in May, which resulted in supply shortages for some manufacturers. Some brands maintained the supply of their products by importing fully assembled handsets. Additionally, last week of the quarter saw components being held up at customs, which also impacted the supply chain, he added.

However, the market is returning to normal with June shipments registering only a small decline of 0.3% Y-o-Y, helped by pent-up demand as well as a push from brands. Due to concerns over potential Covid infection, consumers prefer contactless purchasing and online channels. Smartphone brands are also recognising this trend by pushing more inventory to online channels, the agency pointed out.

Disclaimer: This story is auto-aggregated by a computer program and has not been created or edited by Me . Publisher: The Financial Express

How to Use Hashtags on Facebook

How to Use Hashtags on Facebook

We all know Facebook has hashtags — but should they be part of your Facebook marketing strategy?

Before you read their replies, let’s look at results from a study by Social Bakers, which examined how Facebook engagement correlates hashtag use.

(Takeaway: too many hashtags lowers engagement — and won’t help you )

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